Grand Bassa County: Voters Hopeful Elections Would Bring Change

Buchanan, Grand Bassa County – Despite the ongoing legal rumbling over the conduct of the run-off presidential election, some voters in Grand Bassa County seem poised to exercise their democratic franchise once the dust settles.

Some are optimistic their decision at the poll would impact Liberia’s development, others who were denied voting due to issues with the voter registration roster are now hopeful.

“We are going to vote our favorite candidate that can make the difference when he is elected,” said David Jackson of Tarr Barr community.

Jackson said he is “fully involve” with the electoral process because he is “tired of living uncomfortable life in his own country”.

“[You have] seen where I am living, the whole day I can hustle yet and still no money to help myself and my family,” he said. “We have iron ore, crude oil, rubber and almost every other natural resources you think about we have, while are we still suffering.”

Mondaymar Gibson, another resident of the port city, said the challenges women are enduring due to the turbulent economic condition in the country motivate female like her to commit to participating in the election.

“We the women are now the breadwinners for our families because there are no jobs for our husbands, so if we elect the right person we believe that jobs will come and our husbands will work hard to help us take care of our homes,” she said.

She continues: “We are going to turn out in huge numbers as women to vote for change in Liberia because we are the ones really suffering.”

For Samuel Garjay, a first-time voter who was turned away from voting during the October 10th elections, is now confident of participating in the impending runoff.

“We wanted to vote this gone October but we were denied from voting on grounds that our names were not in the real booklets. The National Election Commission told us that if you have your voting cards you will vote but last October we left before they made the pronouncement,” Garjay said.

“But this time we are sure we will vote.”

Some voters with VR cards were turned away voting centers because their names were not on the roster. They blame the NEC for the situation despite the commission late announcement that those with valid VR cards should be allowed to vote.

Hundreds of voters had left the queues and went home, some had traveled from far distances and could not return back to the VR center.

Report By: Elton Wroinbee Tiah